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MSc Management of Intellectual Property Law - Modules

Read about the MSc in Management of Intellectual Property programme.

Modules

Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year. Any modules not available in the coming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching staff.


IPLM027 Study Project 

(45 credits)
(Mr Chris Rees) Year 2 for P/T students

The Study Project will enable students to experience the complex interaction of legal, commercial and procedural considerations relevant to the management of a complex set of “real-life” problems with respect to a particular intellectual property matter. They will achieve the means by which to apply their knowledge and understanding from throughout the MSc programme and to make commercially relevant and legally prudent decisions with respect to the facts provided in the study project. Students will also explain their decisions in the strategies they provide in their advice and business plans. Students will engage in independent research and group work as well as apply their knowledge in a piece of individual work. The study project will be an important mechanism by which to develop independent research skills as well as enhance the commercial skills and expertise of students on the programme.


IPLM028 Basic Principles of English Law, Evidence and Practice

Compulsory : non-credit bearing, pass only
Year 1 for P/T students

This module aims to give students general knowledge of the English legal system in order to understand sources of law, the effects on intellectual property and the interaction between intellectual property and other areas of law. Students will obtain knowledge of the legal system and legal language and the ability to apply this understanding to various legal questions. In particular, they will gain an overview of legal principles and their application to various situations and problems. Students will acquire skills and experience in the assimilation and analysis of complex material from various sources, and will present the relevant knowledge and understanding through reasoned and supported research papers. The module will promote research skills as well as deliver practical and commercial skills for further training or research as desired.


IPLM031 The Law of Competition I 

(Mr Ashley Roughton, Hogarth Chambers, London)

The course provides students with the skills and expertise in the law of competition and its interaction with the practice and management of intellectual property. The course also provides students with experience in the application of competition law in a commercial context, including exposure to licensing agreements, franchising and competition disputes.

Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, candidates will be expected to demonstrate:

  • Outline Knowledge of:   History of competition law

General Knowledge of:  

  • Wider objectives of the European Community
  • Single market
  • Free movement of goods and services
  • Competition law regime in England and the EU
  • Institutions and sources of law in the EU

Detailed Knowledge of:

  • Competition law issues in the practice of intellectual property law
  • Articles 101 & 102
  • Regulation 1/2003
  • Horizontal agreements (particularly those with vertical effect)
  • Vertical agreements and technology transfer
  • Trademark and copyright licensing agreements
  • Franchising agreements
  • Dominance
  • Abuse of dominant positions 

IPLM033 The Law of Copyright and Design I 

(first term, 22.5 credits) Tuesday, 10.00 – 12.00
COMPULSORY FOR PROFESSIONAL STREAM  
(IPLM033 - cannot be used in conjunction with IPLM034) (Professor Guido Westkamp, QM; Professor Gillian Davies, Hogarth Chambers, London)

The Law of Copyright and Designs I will provide students with a basic foundation in the law of copyright and designs. Students will gain knowledge and understanding of the application of copyright in literary and artistic works, the concepts of authorship and ownership, and the operation of moral rights of the author and performer. Students will also explore the background of the present legal situation regarding UK, European and International copyright and design law and consider in detail the principles of copyright law and UK and European design law, such as subject matter, exclusive rights and limitations as well as the specific rules introduced for the protection of computer programs and databases


IPLM039 Media Law

(this module is taught with LLM students)

(first term, 22.5 credits) Tuesday, 16.00 -18.00
IPLM039 (Mr Gavin Sutter, QM)

Media Law introduces the laws and regulations relevant to the general media. The module covers both general content regulation such as libel, copyright and contempt of court in its application to the media, and sector-specific regulation such as Ofcom regulation of broadcast content. Aspects of new media will also be addressed, including the challenges and implications for regulation of the internet and other new media such as mobile television. The module will concentrate on UK and European law, however important international aspects and key jurisdictions will also be considered in certain cases.


IPLM040 The Law of Patents I 

(first term, 22.5 credits) Monday, 10.00 – 12.00
(IPLM040 - cannot be used in conjunction with IPLM041)

Patent Law I will provide students with the foundations of UK patent law so as to equip them for the basics of patent practice in the UK. Students will be introduced to a history of the patent system, including the policy basis for patent protection of innovative products, as well as the legal context in which modern patent practice is undertaken. The course provides students with a detailed understanding of the concept of patentability including the requirements of the patent specification and certain exclusions from patentability. Students will also have a detailed knowledge of infringement and validity, including revocation of patents. Patents Law I will also provide students with a detailed knowledge of important commercial aspects (including exploitation, patent transactions, ownership and employee inventions) as well as procedural aspects, such as formalities, filing and prosecution. Students will also gain an understanding of related areas of protection in the patent industries, including confidential information and trade secrets.


IPLM041 The Law of Patents I & II 

(first and second terms, 45 credits) COMPULSORY FOR PROFESSIONAL STREAM
(cannot be used in conjunction with IPLM040)Year 1 for P/T students

Patent Law I and II will provide students with the foundations of UK patent law so as to equip them for the basics of patent practice in the UK. In addition, students will consider patent law and corporate strategy as well as practical and professional aspects of patent practice, including drafting, claim interpretation, patent prosecution, ethics and corporate governance. Students will also gain a detailed and practical understanding of related areas of protection in the patent industries, including confidential information and trade secrets. The course also addresses aspects of specific sectors, including biotechnology, chemical industries and software industries. Key jurisdictions, including their significance for litigation and commercial strategy, are also considered in a comparative context. Students completing this course will be eligible to sit the CIPA/ITMA exemption papers towards their qualification as UK patent and trade mark attorneys.


IPLM043 Trade Mark Law I 

(first term, 22.5 credits) Monday, 13.00 – 15.00
(IPLM043 - cannot be used in conjunction with IPLM044) (Dr Gail Evans, QM)

Trade Mark Law I introduces students to the law and practice relating to passing off and trade marks, including the registration, enforcement and exploitation of trade mark rights in the UK. The course will also provide candidates with working knowledge of overseas trade mark law in various pre-specified countries. Students will gain a general knowledge of the whole of the Trade Marks Act 1994 with a detailed understanding of specific key sections and the associated Rules. Students will consider in detail registration, registrability and refusal of trade marks, application procedures and leading cases in trade mark law. Principal provisions of European law (including competition aspects) affecting trade mark practice will also be considered. Although the course is specifically concerned with UK trade mark law, students will be introduced to the key international and European instruments in this area.


IPLM044 Trade Mark Law I & II 

(first and second terms, 45 credits) COMPULSORY FOR PROFESSIONAL STREAM (IPLM044 - cannot be used in conjunction with IPLM043) (Dr Gail Evans, QM) Year 1 for P/T students

Trade Mark Law I & II is designed to introduce candidates to the law and practice relating to the registration, enforcement and exploitation of trade mark rights as they apply in the United Kingdom and to provide candidates with working knowledge of overseas trade mark law in various pre-specified countries so that they may advise generally on protection in those jurisdictions (no detailed knowledge of overseas legislation is expected). Students will be equipped with the tools and skills in the fundamentals of trade mark law and practice, including detailed knowledge of procedures and practices relating to the registration, management and enforcement of rights in trade marks. Students completing this course will be eligible to sit the CIPA/ITMA exemption papers towards their professional qualification.


IPLM047 Intellectual Property in Food, Biotechnology and Agriculture

(second term, 22.5 credits) Run over two weeks in 2nd Term 
(IPLM047) (Professor Michael Blakeney, Univ. Of Western Australia, Perth)

The course will examine the role of diverse IP rights in the areas of food, biotechnology and agriculture. Students will explore topics such as the role of patent and plant variety protection and its impact on the biotechnology industry and the protection of agricultural products and foodstuffs by trade mark law and the law relating to geographical indications. Other topics that will be explored include issues such as the interface between IP rights and access to health, the protection of genetic resources or the impact of extended IP protection on biological diversity, and overall the role of IP rights in the context of development. Specific emphasis is placed on the international and European background. Please note that there will not be weekly lectures but that the course will be running as an intensive course over a period of two weeks in 2012. Details will be announced later.


IPLM048 Intellectual Property in the United States

(second term, 22.5 credits) Run over two weeks in 2nd Term 
(IPLM048) (Mr Gary Rinkerman, Attorney at law, Drinker Biddle Reath, Washington, DC)

The course will introduce students to US IP law and will predominantly cover the protection of registered rights in the US such as patents and trade marks, but will also examine other important areas such as copyright law, design patents and publicity rights as well as aspects of IP licensing. The course will provide students with a basic understanding of the fundmantal structures and principles applying in US law. It will also enhance the general perception of IP rights from a comparative perspective, and emphasis is placed therefore on those rules and principles that deviate from the law in the UK and the European Union. Please note that there will not be weekly lectures but that the course will be running as an intensive course over a period of two weeks in 2012. Details will be announced later.


IPLM334 Licensing Intellectual Property

(first term, 22.5 credits – PT Yr 2)

The module will begin with an introduction to the basic principles of intellectual property, contract and competition law as they relate to licensing transactions. The body of the module will be concerned with the character, structure and drafting of licensing agreements for the major forms of intellectual property to include patent, trade mark and copyright licensing. The module will examine in light of statute and case law, the key terms common to such licensing agreements including: ownership; grant of intellectual property; territorial exclusivity; invention improvement; sublicensing; royalties; warranties; indemnities and dispute resolution.


IPLM342 Interactive Entertainment and Intellectual Property Law

(first term, 22.5 credits – PT Yr 2)

(Dr Gaetano Dimita, QMUL)

Interactive Entertainment is bursting with Intellectual Property. In this environment, creativity meets the latest technologies, thereby spawning cutting-edge law issues. Interactive Entertainment and Intellectual Property Law analyses some of the legal and commercial issues that the Interactive Entertainment industry faces in. It delineates and analyses the legal parameters within which video game developers and publishers, and Virtual Worlds platform providers operate and in which users create and consume content.


IPLM343 Interactive Entertainment Law: Contracts and Regulation

(second term, 22.5 credits – PT Yr 2)

(Dr Gaetano Dimita, QMUL)

Interactive Entertainment Law: Contracts and Regulation analyses some of the contractual and regulatory issues that the Interactive Entertainment industry faces in, providing students with an in-depth analysis of the industry from the development to the commercialisation of Interactive Entertainment software products and the administration of online video games and virtual worlds. The module also explores the Business Models applied by the actors in the different product markets.


IPLM346 EU Copyright Law

(second term, 22.5 credits - PT Yr 2)

In this module, students study the law relating to copyright and related rights in the European Union. It covers the relationship between copyright rules and primary Treaty obligations, secondary legislation and the case-law of the Court of Justice. After initial sessions concerning fundamental issues, such as legislative competence and general principles of EU law, and introducing the relevant secondary legislation, the module focuses on a series of current controversies. The module is taught through weekly seminars. Students are expected to have prior awareness of copyright law and are expected to read a range of materials before each seminar.


IPLM347 The Law of Geographical Indications

(first term, 22.5 credits – PT Yr 2)

The module will examine the substantive and procedural law relating to the EU regulation of GIs (Quality Schemes Regulation 1151/2012) including the definition and eligibility of geographical names for registration; control or inspection obligations; enforcement and; the inter-relationship of GIs with trademarks. Complementing the comparative consideration of the relevant substantive law, the course will identify and appraise the underlying theoretical differences that characterize contemporary EU GIs (protected designation of origin (PDO), protected geographical indication (PGI) and traditional speciality guaranteed (TSG)) and trade marks (individual, collective, certification).

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