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Mooting

What is mooting?

Mooting is the verbal presentation of a legal issue or problem. It's an exercise designed to give students the closest experience to appearing in court. Mooting is an excellent chance to meet other students in the School of Law, to talk over interesting legal points, and to test your knowledge in front of the moot judge. Whether you plan a career in the Bar and wish to develop advocacy skills, or simply want to get involved in another activity within the department, mooting provides both social opportunities and educational value, and is highly recommended.

Mooting at Queen Mary

The School of Law has a very strong and successful mooting body. We host our internal George Hinde Moot annually, in which over 150 students compete. Our external mooting teams are also very successful in competitions against students across the country.

Theo, one of this year’s moot officers, provides us with more information...

Mooting is the verbal presentation of a legal case. It is designed to simulate the court environment, and to show and improve your advocacy skills.

Mooting provides the invaluable practical experience of using knowledge learnt on the course. It’s also great for improving research skills, and teaching you how to think on your feet. Participants also get the opportunity to network with legal professionals, which is always a good thing! At Queen Mary we moot both externally and internally.

The George Hinde Moot is our internal competition, which has been running for over forty years. It is open to all law students and you should definitely get involved from your first year. The final of the George Hinde was great; there was a chance to network with many reputable professionals afterwards.

Do you have any professional contacts?

This year we had a workshop run by a QC, who gave very helpful tips on advocacy to everyone who made it to the semi-finals. The George Hinde is adjudicated by practitioner judges, including The Right Honourable Sir Stanley Burnton.

What happens in the external moot competitions?

Teams from Queen Mary compete against other universities in established national and regional mooting competitions. In 2012 the QMUL team were runners-up in the prestigious English Speaking Union/Essex Court Chambers National Moot Competition, and our team won the London Universities Mooting Shield. In 2013, we were runners-up in the London Universities Mooting Shield (LUMS) Competition.

How has mooting helped you as an individual?

It has greatly improved my confidence, advocacy and research skills; all of which proved to be highly useful when studying for exams! It’s also a really great competition to encourage reading full cases, and to improve skills in quickly absorbing relevant information from a large volume of text, which is in my opinion the most important skill for a law student to have.

Mooting News

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